Skip to Search Skip to Global Navigation Skip to Local Navigation Skip to Content
Show/Hide University Links

Women's Studies Institute

Women’s History Month 2017

Women’s History Month 2017

“Cultivate the Past to Prestige” by: Crystal Arias

2016 Women’s Advocate of the Year

2016 Women’s Advocate of the Year

Yonnie Blanchette

2016 Women’s History Month Opening Reception Keynote

2016 Women’s History Month Opening Reception Keynote

Women’s History Week co-founders Drs. Susan Smulyan and Linda Pritchard

Women’s History Month 2016

Women’s History Month 2016

Sexual Assault Awareness Month

Sexual Assault Awareness Month

UTSA Call to Action Day: April 4, 2016

Sexual Assault Awareness Month

Sexual Assault Awareness Month

UTSA Call to Action Day: April 4, 2016

Women’s History Month 2016

Women’s History Month 2016


Women’s History Month Events

Women’s History Month 2017 Schedule of events


Wednesday, March 1

Women’s History Month Opening Program and Reception

2:15 PM

Travis Room HUC 2.202

Adelina Anthony- Keynote speaker

Olga Madrid – Women’s Advocate of the Year


Join the Women’s Studies Institute and Women’s Studies Program as we celebrate our fourteenth year of Women’s History Month at UTSA. During our program, we will award Olga Madrid as the 2017 Women’s Advocate of the Year.


Adelina Anthony hails originally from the Southside of San Antonio, Tejas. She is a critically acclaimed and award winning two-spirit Xicana lesbian multi-genre artist, cultural activist, teaching artist, director, and producer, she works to honor her ancestors. She has been an artist-in-residence for allgo, The L.A. Gay & Lesbian Center, La Peña Cultural Center and for the City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs. Since 2012, along with her wife, Marisa Becerra, she has been a co-founder and managing member of AdeRisa Productions, LLC. She Has her B.A. and M.A. in Drama.


San Antonio native, Olga Madrid, received her BA and Masters of Education degrees from Our Lady of the Lake University and taught for 23 years at Collins Garden Elementary School. A longtime YWCA San Antonio supporter, she is a life member and past president of YWCA San Antonio, serving on the board as the first Hispanic president.  She also served on the national YWCA board for 12 years. Mrs. Madrid raised funding and secured City of San Antonio support for the building of a West Side YWCA community center in the Las Palmas area on the West Side of San Antonio.  The center opened in 1977 and was named the “Olga H. Madrid Center.”  The Madrid Center houses the YWCA’s Child Development Center and many of its other community services.  Mrs. Madrid has also been active in numerous civic efforts focused on improving the community through educational opportunity, enhanced healthcare and beautification efforts.




Thursday, March 2

Sarah Cusimano Miles

Solomon’s House

11:30 AM

ART 3.01.18 B


Solomon’s House, which explores the collections repository of the Anniston Museum of Natural History in Alabama. The specimens are taken from the dark storage where they reside and bathed with light to illuminate the often disturbing and exquisite elegance of the accumulated and warehoused organisms. By portraying these objects through the tradition of the still life, the artists explores ideas of cultural decadence and beauty in stasis.



Dr. Treva Lindsey

From Tubman to Assata’s Daughters: The Legacy of Black Women’s Radical Activism

1:00 PM

HUC Ballroom 1.106


Dr. Treva Lindsey is an associate professor at The Ohio State University. Dr. Lindsey’s area of expertise includes black feminist theory, women’s history, and popular culture. Dr. Lindsey is a recipient of fellowships from the Woodrow Wilson Foundation, the Social Science Research council, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, Emory University, The National Women’s Association, and the Center of Arts and Humanities at the University of Missouri.


Co-Sponsored by Dr. Joycelyn Moody, Sue E. Denman Distinguished Chair in American Literature; Dr. Sonja Lanehart, Brackenridge Endowed Chair in Literature and the Humanities, Department of English; Department of History; The African American Studies Program; and Delta Sigma Theta Sorority – Upsilon Nu Chapter.



Adelina Anthony

Screening of Bruising for Besos

6:30 PM

HUC Ballroom 1.106


Bruising for Besos is an art film and intimate character study of Yoli—a charismatic Xicana lesbian making familia in a queer/trans people of color scene in Los Angeles. She’s an artist at heart, and along with her best friend, Rani, she makes do with a mundane job. One night she decides to pursue Daña, an alluring Puerto Rican woman. This romance upends the seeming calmness of Yoli’s present life. She soon finds herself recreating a tumultuous past and must choose between a familiar pattern of hurt or begin to face the history that haunts her in order to learn to love "right."


Co-sponsored by the Honors College; College of Public Policy; Consortium for Social Transformation; Department of English;  Department of Bicultural-Bilingual Studies; Department of History; PIVOT for Academic Success; Student Center for Community Engagement and Inclusion; and Dr. Joycelyn Moody, Sue E. Denman Distinguished Chair in American Literature. The Women's Studies Institute acknowledges the support of Trinity University; Dr. Norma Cantú, Norine R. and T. Frank Murchison Professor of Humanities; and  Dr. Rosana Blanco-Cano, Director of The Mexico, the Americas, and Spain (MAS) Program.




Saturday, March 4

11:00 AM

Step Off: Plaza de Zacate (Milam Park)

San Antonio Women Will March

San Antonio International Women’s Day March and Rally


“We, like women and girls all over the world, are the voices of conscience, the roots of change and the leaders of local and global movements.  Out of love for our communities, we come together time and time again to envision and create a world in which all people are free from exploitation, oppression and violence...We have come together to make positive social change and have been the targets of racist, classist, homophobic and sexist attacks.  Despite this history of repression, we continue to stand together, unwavering on the issues that are of critical importance to our communities...We claim our own voices and come together to share them in public spaces.  We march in solidarity with women and social justice movements around the world.”


For more information, please visit www.sawomenwillmarch.org




Monday, March 6 - Friday, March 10

During the week of March 6-10, JPL is celebrating Women’s History Month with a “Pop Up” Station titled “Women in Comics.” The station will be on the 2ndFloor, in the alcove area that is to the right of the grand staircase.

·Browse any of the graphic novels from the collection that will be on display. If they choose, students can check out any of the books that are on display at the Front Desk.

·Take home a free comic book (only have a few, these will likely go fast)

·Watch a Kanopy streaming video (with headphones) titled Wonder Women! The Untold Story of American Superheroines – the video will loop all day

·Create a comic book panel or character of their own using the templates and art supplies provided

·Enter a random drawing to win a new graphic novel 

·Take their picture against a themed backdrop and post to Instagram for a chance to win a library t-shirt




Monday, March 6

UTSA Beaks Up. Speak Up. Initiative

Bringing in the Bystander®

5:30 PM

RWC 2.214 (Texas Room)


Bringing in the Bystander® is the signature program of the Beaks up. Speak up. Bystander Intervention Initiative.  Bringing in the Bystander® is a training program designed to help engage students in the fight against sexual violence, particularly violence against women.  The program starts by helping participants examine a history of sexism and rape culture and the connection to the perpetration of violence against women.  Participants then learn to recognize a continuum of behaviors that contribute to sexual violence.  Through story-telling, participants also begin empathize with the experience of victims of sexual violence.  Finally, students learn ways to safely and effectively intervene in situations which contribute to the perpetuation of violence against women.


Seats are limited. Email Brittany.stevens@utsa.edu to secure your spot.


Sponsored by Counseling Services




Thursday, March 9

Mayra Lucas

Eating Disorders & Body Love: The Things Mama Didn’t Tell You

2:30 PM

HUC 2.202 (Travis Room)


There are things that our mothers did not get the chance to teach us. Whatever existing or non-existing relationship we may have with our mothers, this workshop is an opportunity to learn about things that our caregivers kept silent or never had the chance to talk to us about while growing up. This workshop will discuss the connection historical trauma has with eating disorders and the way colonialism has impacted the way people of color and indigenous people view their bodies. Furthermore, participants will have the opportunity to learn about the dominance of white-thin-cis-hetero industrial complex and how it influences the way marginalized people get seen and treated in overall society. This workshop is coming from the perspective of a woman of color and welcomes people from all backgrounds to participate.




******* SPRING BREAK: March 13 – 17 *********




Monday, March 20

Ebony Stewart

The Gully Princess: Softness is Not a Weakness

6:00 PM

JPL 4.04.22 (Library Assembly Room)


Ebony uses poetry, performance, real-life, and experiences from teaching in the classroom as resources to address sexual health, body image, and self-esteem. Her mission is to improve, support, and protect the lives of women, people of color and the LGBTQ community by creating a healing space, through her work and discussion, where we know our worth, acknowledge our struggles and celebrate our victories.




Tuesday, March 21

Anel Flores and Sarah Castillo

On Not Belonging (Anywhere): San Antonio Artivists on Trauma and Art

10 AM

HUC 2.214, Hidalgo Room


In this plática, artivists Sarah Castillo and Anel I. Flores will discuss how their respective bodies of work address Chicanas’ feelings of “not belonging” and trauma. Castillo is a visual artist, author of a published thesis titled, “Art as an Embodied Practice: Artistic Expression, Conocimiento, and Identity Formation," and the founder of Lady Base Gallery, a group that supports women and LGTBQIA artists in the San Antonio community. Flores, a Tejana, lesbian writer, and artist, is the author of the Lambda literary award nominated book, Empanada: A Lesbiana Story en Probaditas, and co-editor for the forthcoming anthology Jota.




Wednesday, March 22

UTSA Beaks Up. Speak Up. Initiative

Bringing in the Bystander®

9:30 AM

RWC 1.806 (Health and Counseling Classroom)


Bringing in the Bystander® is the signature program of the Beaks up. Speak up. Bystander Intervention Initiative.  Bringing in the Bystander® is a training program designed to help engage students in the fight against sexual violence, particularly violence against women.  The program starts by helping participants examine a history of sexism and rape culture and the connection to the perpetration of violence against women.  Participants then learn to recognize a continuum of behaviors that contribute to sexual violence.  Through story-telling, participants also begin empathize with the experience of victims of sexual violence.  Finally, students learn ways to safely and effectively intervene in situations which contribute to the perpetuation of violence against women.


Seats are limited. Email Brittany.stevens@utsa.edu to secure your spot.


Sponsored by Counseling Services



Dr. Monique Morris

Mapping and Responding to School Pushout among Black Girls

10:00 AM

Retama Auditorium UC 2.02.02


Dr. Monique Morris holds an Ed.D doctoral degree and was a 2012 Soros Fellow. Dr. Morris is Co-Founder and President of The National Black Women’s Justice Institute, former Vice President for Economic Programs, Advocacy and Research at the NAACP and former Director of Research for the Thelton E. Henderson Center for Social Justice at UC Berkley Law School. Dr. Morris has over twenty years professional experience in the areas of social justice, education, civil rights and juveniles. Dr. Morris has authored three books, including Pushout which details the criminalization of black girls in school. Dr. Morris has worked with numerous agencies over the course of twenty years, and was previously adjunct professor at University of San Francisco. Currently, Dr. Morris is adjunct associate professor at St. Mary’s College of California.


Co-Sponsored by Dr. Sonja Lanehart, Brackenridge Endowed Chair in Literature and the Humanities, Department of English; Consortium for Social Transformation; The African American Studies Program; and Department of Sociology.



Dr. Norma Elia Cantú

Tejana Literature and Archives

1:00 PM

BB 3.01.06


Dr. Norma Cantú is a UTSA Professor Emeritus and a Professor at Trinity University. She received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Texas A&I at Laredo and Kingsville, respectively, and her Ph.D. from the University of Nebraska, Lincoln. At Laredo State University, later renamed Texas A&M International University, she taught and served as Chair and Interim Dean. She was a senior arts administrator with the National Endowment for the Arts in Washington, DC and was Acting Chair of the Chicano Studies Research Center at the University of California at Santa Barbara. Her teaching interests include Cultural Studies, Contemporary Literary Theory, Border Studies, Chicano/a and Latina/o Literature & Film, Folklore and Women’s Studies. Dr. Cantú has published articles on a number or academic subjects as well as poetry and fiction. Her publications on border literatureire/, the teaching of English, quinceañera celebration and the matachines, a religious dance tradition have earned her an international reputation as a scholar and folklorist. She has co-edited four books and edited a collection of testimonios by Chicana scientists, mathematicians and engineers. Her award winning Canícula: Snapshots of a Girlhood en la Frontera chronicles her childhood experiences on the border. She edits the Rio Grande/Rio Bravo Culture and Traditions book series at The Texas A&M University Press.




Thursday, March 23

Can We Talk? ...About Civil Rights in Texas

5:30 PM

SAWS Headquarters (2800 US Highway 281 North)


Can We Talk? Invites Executive Director of the Texas Civil Rights Project, Mimi Marziani, to speak about civil rights advocacy, political campaigns, election law, and nonprofit management. For ticket information, contact: (210) 422-2245 or can_we_talk_sa@yahoo.com




Monday, March 27

Alma Smith, Jennifer De La Rosa, Vanessa Jimenez

YWCA San Antonio Herstory: Past, Present and Future

11:00 AM

MH 2.02.10


Did you know the YWCA is a local non-profit that has been offering an array of services to women and their families for over 100 years? This panel presentation will provide a glimpse into the operations of the organization and its community impact.




Tuesday, March 28

The San Antonio Four

6:00 PM – 7:15 PM

Bexar Room, HUC 1.102


LOGLINE: After being wrongfully convicted of gang-raping two little girls during the Satanic Panic witchhunt era of the 80s and 90s, four Latina lesbians fight against mythology, homophobia, and prosecutorial fervor in their struggle for exoneration in this riveting 'True Crime' tale.


SYNOPSIS: Southwest of Salem: The Story of the San Antonio Four excavates the nightmarish persecution of Elizabeth Ramirez, Cassandra Rivera, Kristie Mayhugh, and Anna Vasquez — four Latina lesbians wrongfully convicted of gang-raping two little girls in San Antonio, Texas. The film begins its journey inside a Texas prison, after these women have spent nearly a decade behind bars. They were 19 and 20 years at the time that allegations surfaced.


Using the women’s home video footage from 21 years ago combined with recent verité footage and interviews, the film explores their personal narratives and their search for exculpatory evidence to help their losing criminal trials. 15 years into their journey, director Deborah S. Esquenazi captures an on-camera recantation by one of the initial outcry victims, now 25 years old although 7 at the time of the investigation. This brings the filmmaker into the role of investigator along with attorneys at the Innocence Project, who are just beginning their quest for truth in this case.


Together with attorneys, the film culminates with the women being released from prison to await their searing new exoneration hearings in San Antonio. Helming new legislation, this is the first case in U.S. history that allows wrongfully convicted innocents to challenge convictions based on ‘Junk Science’, or debunked forensics. As lesbian low income women of color, these women hold intersecting identities that make them the most vulnerable to incarceration and juror bias. This under-reported injustice is actually widespread: Latina women represent one of the growing populations heading into prison. In addition, most reported exonerations and wrongful convictions focus solely on men and cases involving women, let alone lesbian women of color are largely under reported. The film unravels the interplay of mythology, homophobia, and prosecutorial fervor that led to their indictment.




Wednesday, March 29

ire’ne lara silva

Tejana Myth, Memory, and Fiction

1:00 PM – 2:00 PM

MB 2.404


Tejana/Indígena author ire’ne lara silva will read from her latest work and discuss her approach to reimagining Tejan@ myths.


ire’ne lara silva is the author of two chapbooks: ani’mal and INDíGENA. Her first collection of poetry, furia, was published by Mouthfeel Press in October 2010 and received an Honorable Mention for the 2011 International Latino Book Award in Poetry. Her first collection of short stories, flesh to bone, was published by Aunt Lute Press in 2013. flesh to bone received the 2013 Premio Aztlan, placed 2ND for the 2014 TEJAS NACCS FOCO Award in Fiction, and was a Finalist for ForeWard Review’s Book of the Year Award in Multicultural Fiction. flesh to bone was also selected as the May 2014 Book of the Month for the National Latino Book Club/Las Comadres.




Thursday, March 30

Crystal Arias

Cultivate the Past to Prestige

1:00 PM

MH 3.02.26


Crystal Arias is a local artist commissioned by San Anto Cultural Arts to paint murals on the West side of San Antonio. Her presentation will discuss her current mural “Cultivate the Past to Prestige” at La India Herbs and themes she utilizes in her other works. Arias began painting in 2009 and was recruited by Alex Rubio from Blue Star Arts Complex in 2010.



UTSA Beaks Up. Speak Up. Initiative

Bringing in the Bystander®

5:30 PM

RWC 2.214 (Texas Room)


Bringing in the Bystander® is the signature program of the Beaks up. Speak up. Bystander Intervention Initiative.  Bringing in the Bystander® is a training program designed to help engage students in the fight against sexual violence, particularly violence against women.  The program starts by helping participants examine a history of sexism and rape culture and the connection to the perpetration of violence against women.  Participants then learn to recognize a continuum of behaviors that contribute to sexual violence.  Through story-telling, participants also begin empathize with the experience of victims of sexual violence.  Finally, students learn ways to safely and effectively intervene in situations which contribute to the perpetuation of violence against women.


Seats are limited. Email Brittany.stevens@utsa.edu to secure your spot.


Sponsored by Counseling Services