Dr.  Belinda Bustos Flores


     

Biography


Belinda Bustos Flores, professor, University of Texas at San Antonio, completed her Ph.D. at the University of Texas, Austin in Curriculum and Instruction with specializations in Multilingual Studies and Educational Psychology. In 2000, she received the 1st place award for Outstanding Dissertation from The National Association for Bilingual Education (NABE). She was awarded the 2004 UTSA President’s Distinguished Award for Research Excellence. Her research interests and publications in peer reviewed, Tier I journals focus on teacher development including self-concept, ethnic identity, efficacy, beliefs, teacher recruitment/retention, and high stakes testing. Publications also focus on teacher sociocultural knowledge of family cultural literacy. Dr. Flores’ work has been cited in top journals such as the BRJ, Curriculum Inquiry, Curriculum Studies, Educational Researcher, Educational Administration Quarterly, Educational Studies, Handbook of Teacher Education, Journal of Early Childhood Teacher Education, Journal of Latinos & Education, Journal of Hispanic Higher Education, Multicultural Perspectives, Teachers College Record, The Reading Teacher, The Urban Review, and Young Children. An upcoming Routledge edited book, Preparing Teachers for Bilingual Student Populations: Educar para Transforma (Flores, Sheets, Clark, 2011) is expected to transform the preparation of teachers and teacher educators alike.

In addition to being a nationally renown scholar, Dr. Flores is the founder of the UTSA’s Academy for Teacher Excellence (ATE). In 2003, she received a Title V Grant from the Department of Education to create ATE at UTSA. Over the last 6 years, she has obtained three USDOE’s Transition to Teaching Grants to certify degreed individuals in the critical shortage areas of mathematics, science, and special education. In 2007, Dr. Flores was awarded a research grant to explore the conditions that promote the retention of teachers teaching in low performing schools and to examine the academic, personal, and cultural indicators of successful mathematics and science teachers, specifically those teaching English language learners. In 2008, Dr. Flores received a foundation grant to create an induction learning community and to study the impact of induction support on novice teachers working in critical teaching shortage areas. Most recently, she acquired another Title V, USDOE grant, ATE: Equity, Education and Entrepreneurship (ATE E3) to further strengthen the preparation of teachers in the areas of math, science, and technology. Dr. Flores recently received a $2000 research award, plus travel expenses to deliver a commissioned paper at University of California -LMRI Conference entitled: Examining the preparation of math and science teachers as culturally efficacious for classrooms serving English Learners. Based on her expertise, she was selected to serve on the HACU Hispanic Higher Education Research Collaborative (H3ERC) Panel.

Under Dr. Flores leadership, the Academy for Teacher Excellence has (1) recruited, retained, and supported over 400 undergraduate teacher candidates, with majority being Latino women; (2) provided induction support to over 150 novice teachers; and (3) recruited, supported, retained, and certified 102 graduate students in math, science, and special education (80% women and 50% Latinos working with about 7,500 low income, minority high school students). In addition to student support, ATE has funded 42 faculty research projects totaling $138,000, funded 3 doctoral student fellowships totaling $55,000, supported 6 graduate assistants totaling $80,000, and sponsored 30 professional development seminars providing $18,000 in faculty stipends. ATE E3 goals are to increase minority student access to education through the use of technology; to date the project has supplied over 200 students and 50 faculty with Iphones and netbooks as educational and instructional tools.