Restorative Justice

Tuesday, November 28, 2017

   
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Tuesday, November 28, 2017


{startdate} 2017-05-04 12:00:00 2017-05-04 18:00:00 Europe/London Restorative Justice

With special guests:

Robert Rico, MPA

Lecturer

College of Public Policy

Department of Criminal Justice

 

 

Sophia Bahena, Ed.D.

Assistant Professor

College of Education and Human Development

Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies

 

What is restorative justice?
Restorative Justice is an alternative form of the traditional justice system.  Restorative Justice is modeled after informal communal justice strategies used by indigenous people throughout human history, by many cultures and across many faith traditions.  It views crime as a violation of people and relationships.  Restorative Justice holds persons responsible for crime by enabling them to be personally accountable to those they have harmed through direct dialogue and communication.
 

Why is it important?
The United States currently confines over 2.3 million adults in prisons and jails or roughly one in every 100 citizens.  Critics argue that this level of incarceration is very costly, does not address the needs of victims and does not hold offenders accountable.  Restorative Justice plays a huge role in reducing the rate of recidivism, and schools implementing restorative justice programs have shown a reduction in offenses committed. In schools, zero-tolerance policies fail to repair the damage to relationships and fails to prevent recurrence.  Studies have shown that school-based restorative justice offers a more sustainable, equitable and respectful alternative to dealing with misbehavior.  It offers a culture of connectivity where all members of the community can thrive.
 

Source:  The Office of Community and Restorative Justice at UTSA

Other - 801 N. Olive Street, San Antonio, Texas 78202 http://mswomenscenter.org

With special guests:

Robert Rico, MPA

Lecturer

College of Public Policy

Department of Criminal Justice

 

 

Sophia Bahena, Ed.D.

Assistant Professor

College of Education and Human Development

Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies

 

What is restorative justice?
Restorative Justice is an alternative form of the traditional justice system.  Restorative Justice is modeled after informal communal justice strategies used by indigenous people throughout human history, by many cultures and across many faith traditions.  It views crime as a violation of people and relationships.  Restorative Justice holds persons responsible for crime by enabling them to be personally accountable to those they have harmed through direct dialogue and communication.
 

Why is it important?
The United States currently confines over 2.3 million adults in prisons and jails or roughly one in every 100 citizens.  Critics argue that this level of incarceration is very costly, does not address the needs of victims and does not hold offenders accountable.  Restorative Justice plays a huge role in reducing the rate of recidivism, and schools implementing restorative justice programs have shown a reduction in offenses committed. In schools, zero-tolerance policies fail to repair the damage to relationships and fails to prevent recurrence.  Studies have shown that school-based restorative justice offers a more sustainable, equitable and respectful alternative to dealing with misbehavior.  It offers a culture of connectivity where all members of the community can thrive.
 

Source:  The Office of Community and Restorative Justice at UTSA

Admission

Sponsor/Contact

Martinez Street Women's Center
http://mswomenscenter.org

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